Events


COVID 19 In a fit of unbridled optimism, we have selected plays for 2021 on the assumption that some version of live theatre will be possible. Of course we don’t know when (or even if) things will return to normality, but on the assumption that they will, we hope to present the following plays:

  •  09/03/2021 19:45 - 13/03/2021 22:00
  •   Stamford Arts Centre

"I am a Camera" by John van Druten, directed Nigel Kuhn. Based on Christopher Isherwood’s memoirs Goodbye to Berlin, and the inspiration for the musical Cabaret, I am a Camera is part glamorous whirlwind of Berlin Bohemia, part harrowing depiction of the Nazi’s rise to power. I am a Camera’s title is a quote taken from Isherwood’s first page – “I am a camera with its shutter open, quite passive, recording, not thinking”. The play’s Broadway premiere in 1951 was a triumph for Julie Harris as the insouciant Sally Bowles, winning her the first of her four Tony Awards for Best Leading Actress in a play. A subsequent 1955 film adaptation was also called I Am a Camera. With a screenplay by John Collier and music by Malcolm Arnold, it starred Julie Harris, Laurence Harvey and Shelley Winters. The play and film in turn went on to inspire the musical Cabaret in 1966 by John Kander and Fred Ebb and the1972 film Cabaret with Liza Minnelli, Joel Grey and Michael York.

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  • £10
  •  08/06/2021 19:45 - 12/06/2021 22:00
  •   Stamford Arts Centre, Saint Mary's Street, Stamford, UK

By Dion Boucicault, adapted by Richard Bean. Dion Boucicault, the Irish genius of London theatre in the age of Dickens, wrote the brilliantly funny "London Assurance" in 1841 and thereby created, in Sir Harcourt and Lady Spanker, two of the great comic roles of the English stage This new version of the play, revised by Richard Bean, who wrote the hilarious “One Man, Two Guvnors”, was an outstanding success at the National Theatre in 2010.

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  •  07/09/2021 19:45 - 11/09/2021 22:00
  •   Stamford Arts Centre

"My Mother Said I Never Should", directed by Estella Todisco. Charlotte Keatley’s award-winning play is the most commonly performed work by a female playwright worldwide. A story about the difficult relationships between mothers and daughters, "My Mother Said I Never Should" explores the lives and relationships of four generations of women: Doris, Margaret, Jackie and Rosie. Their loves, expectations and choices are set against the huge social changes of the twentieth century. This is what the playwright said about her play when she was interviewed early this year: "I think it’s a play that anyone, any age or gender, can relate to: it’s about family, and ordinary family, working class and middle class characters. And love, how we show it or withhold it; and ambition, what that is in each generation. And it’s both funny and moving, so it’s a play that makes us react - either acting in it or watching it. When I’m writing plays I think about this: I want the audience to laugh and cry and be truly moved, in one evening."

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  •  08/12/2021 19:45 - 11/12/2021 22:15
  •   Stamford Arts Centre, Saint Mary's Street, Stamford, UK

By Charles Dickens, adapted for the stage by John Mortimer. Directed by Heather Wass and Liz Cullum. An intriguing and entertaining version of Dickens’ classic tale. Two weeks in December is a new departure for Shoestring. On 12 to 14 December, when we are not performing, the Arts centre cinema will be operating.

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  •  15/12/2021 19:45 - 18/12/2021 22:15
  •   Stamford Arts Centre, Saint Mary's Street, Stamford, UK

By Charles Dickens, adapted for the stage by John Mortimer. Directed by Heather Wass and Liz Cullum. An intriguing and entertaining version of Dickens’ classic tale.

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  • £10
  •  03/03/2020 19:45 - 03/07/2020 22:00
  •   Stamford Arts Centre, Saint Mary's Street, Stamford, UK

by Anton Chekhov in a new version by David Hare. Set in late 19th century Russia, where people are experiencing change and facing an uncertain future, Chekhov’s great comedy is very relevant today. David Hare’s new version was premiered at Chichester in 2015 and transferred to the National Theatre in 2016 to great acclaim. On a summer’s day a young writer named Konstantin puts on his bold new play starring his beautiful neighbour, Nina. The assembled family audience includes his mother, a selfish fading star of the provincial stage, and her lover a famous novelist. What happens during and after the performance will change not just the course of the summer, but the lives of everyone involved for ever. 3rd-7th March, 2020 Tickets £10 (£8)

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  • £10
  •  03/12/2019 19:45 - 07/12/2019 07:45
  •   Stamford Arts Centre, Saint Mary's Street, Stamford, UK

Love or knowledge: which would you choose? This was the dilemma faced by university women students well into the 20th Century. Girton College, Cambridge, was one of the first colleges in Britain to admit women. The ladies match their male peers grade for grade but they are not allowed to graduate. They leave university stigmatised as ‘blue stockings’ – without degrees and unmarriageable; regarded as ‘unnatural, educated women’. The year is 1896 and the lively play tells the story of Tess Moffat and a group of ‘first-years’ determined to win the right to a degree. Their story is followed over one tumultuous year as they encounter the many hurdles in their way - the class divide, misogyny, and the university opposition – not to mention the distractions of love. Finally the whole issue is put to the vote… Tickets £10 (£8 concession)

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  • £10
  •  10/09/2019 19:45 - 14/09/2019 07:45
  •   Stamford Arts Centre, Saint Mary's Street, Stamford, UK

Zoë wants a baby. Maggie wants her mum to follow her halfway round the world. Steve wants his mother-in-law to sell her Lincolnshire home. Hugo wants to get to know his new family. And Muriel? She has ideas of her own, but nobody’s bothered to ask her what they are. This wry and fast-moving comedy exposes the ties that bind us together – and how easily they start to fray.

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  • £14
  •  15/07/2019 20:00 - 19/07/2019 23:00
  •   The Minack Theatre, Porthcurno, Penzance TR19 6JU

We are lucky enough to be part of the roster of visiting companies to the beautiful Minack Theatre in Cornwall, and will be performing our highly successful play The Roses of Eyam in July 2019. This remarkable true story tells of a village in Derbyshire stricken with plague through the arrival from London of a box of clothing. The villagers make a heroic decision, persuaded by the present and former Rectors, to prevent its spread by remaining within the village and containing the disease at the certain risk of their own lives. As the plot unfolds, we experience the human tragedies and even comedies that ensued and the idealism and the courage required to live within that idealism. Live music is played throughout this production to set the scene and to create the authentic atmosphere of 17th Century England. Traditional English folk songs have been chosen to fit with the action of the play. There are tunes particularly associated with Derbyshire and tunes from the collection of John Playford, a 17th Century collector and publisher of dance music.

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  •  04/06/2019 19:45 - 08/06/2019 19:45
  •   Stamford Arts Centre Theatre

A cast of 40 actors and musicians tell this remarkable true story of a 17th Century Derbyshire village stricken with plague through the arrival of an infected box of clothing from London. The villagers make a heroic decision, persuaded by the present and former Rectors, to prevent its spread by remaining within the village at the certain risk of their own lives. As the plot unfolds, we experience the human tragedies and even comedies that ensue, and the idealism and the courage required to live within that idealism. Live music is played throughout our production to set the scene and to create the authentic atmosphere of 17th Century England. Traditional English folk songs have been carefully chosen to fit with the action of the play.

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  •  11/12/2018 19:45
  •   Stamford Arts Centre 27 St Mary's Street Stamford Lincs. PE9 2DL

Written by David Haig | Directed by Kay Roberts A play to commemorate the end of World War One in November 1918. Rudyard Kipling’s determination to secure a commission for his short-sighted son to fight in the Great War triggers a bitter family conflict, leaving the world-famous author devastated. Kipling is torn apart by his love for his son, his family and his devotion to King and Country. Please see the Gallery page for photographs of rehearsals and costumed characters.

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  •  09/11/2018 22:10
  •   Stamford Arts Centre, Saint Mary's Street, Stamford, UK

A very silly tale of not much at all! The play is newly created comedy about evergreen characters, known and enjoyed by several generations; it’s a romp of great silliness involving multiple role playing and enormous energy. Bertie Wooster is unwisely co-opted by relations to help achieve various things: obtaining a cow creamer; resolving romantic conundrums; and other similar frivolities. He is patiently assisted by his long-suffering butler, Jeeves.

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  •  10/03/2018 19:45
  •   Stamford Arts Centre, 27 St Mary's St, Stamford PE9 2DL, UK

The idealistic Dr Stockmann discovers dangerous flaws in the new spa development that promises huge rewards for his home town and its inhabitants. As he battles against vested interests, important questions are raised about personal loyalty, press freedom and the greater good. With wit and considerable humour, the play explores these moral complexities, while still honouring the dark heart of the original. This fast-paced, pared-down version of Ibsen’s classic by Rebecca Lenkiewicz packs a powerful punch in its treatment of a story with continuing relevance today.

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  •  11/12/2017 19:30 - 15/05/2017 19:30
  •   Stamford Arts Centre, Saint Mary's Street, Stamford, UK

Kindertransport was written by Diane Samuels. Separated from her German Jewish parents at the age of nine, Eva is brought to England on the Kindertransport with the promise of a new life. Under the care of her kindly foster mother Lil, the young Eval slowly acclimatises to her new life and, at length, believing her parents to have perished in the camps, tries to re-invent herself as English. But memories and fears are not so easily erased. When her own daughter starts to question the story her mother has woven over the years, the protective shell that Eva, now calling herself Evelyn, has built around herself begins to crack. This modern classic about one woman’s struggle to come to terms with her past is told with tenderness and warmth, across the generations and the years. The issues explored remain as pertinent to us today as when the events of the late 1930’s unfolded in Germany and England.

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